The information booth of the Panama Tourism Authority (ATP) in Valle de Antón recorded a total of 9,795 tourist consultations in 2013, of which approximately 52.1% were by foreigners. 

Panama has climbed to 6th place in the Ranking of the Americas by the International Congress and Convention Association, an entity that highlighted the 60 congresses and conventions held in Panama City that boosted the country ten places higher than in 2012, when it was ranked 36th. This was the topic Caribbean News Digital (CND) Panama discussed with the Panama Tourism Authority's Deputy Minister, Ernesto Orillac.

Altos de Campana National Park

Written by Tuesday, 27 May 2014 11:09

This protected area, located near the coasts and floodplains of the town of Chame, was created in 1966 as the first national park. The topography across its 4,925 hectares rises from 400 meters above sea level at its lowest point up to the 1,030-meter Cerro la Cruz, and from this natural attraction and hilltop you have a spectacular view of both oceans and the Panama Canal basin. You can also take in panoramic views of other landscape features, such as rivers, estuaries, the rocky outcrop Espave and the Chame Bay. The area is delightful to observe wildlife and go on nature walks during the cool temperatures. At dawn and dusk a fog descends and you will find yourself surrounded by nature.

Location

Located 50 kilometers from Panama City in the province of West Panama, along the Pan-American Highway.

How to arrive

  • Car: After crossing the Bridge of the Americas, also known as Centennial Bridge, drive along the Pan-American Highway until kilometer 60. About 10 minutes after passing the village of Capira,you will see the Loma Campana park entrance on your right hand side.

  • Bus: At the Albrook Grand Terminal you can board a bus taking any of the following routes: Panama - Chame, Panama - Chitré, Coclé, Los Santos, David. Tell your bus driver that your destination is the Altos de Campana park entrance, right off the Pan-American Highway and marked with a sign on the right hand side. From there you can take a taxi up to the park ranger's booth so that you can receive an orientation, precautions, and instructions for your visit.

What to bring

  • Tent and camping gear
  • Water bottles
  • Insect repellent
  • First aid kit
  • Hiking shoes or boots
  • Camera
  • Map of the site

Activities

  • Mountain hiking
  • Nature walks
  • Observe wildlife
  • Camping

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Punta Chame

Written by Tuesday, 27 May 2014 11:00

The first thing you'll see is the vast series of beaches that comprise the province of West Panama and connect with the beaches of Coclé. The scenic drive down this peninsula is on a highway flanked by beaches and also affords breathtaking views of the highlands of Chame, Campana, Taboga, Otoque, and Boná. Along the way you can stop at craft booths or roadside restaurants for a delicious breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Location

Located 100 km from Panama City, in the area of ​​West Panama after the city of Chorrera.

How to arrive

  • Car: Take the Pan-American Highway for about 72 kilometers until you reach a Terpel gas station in the town of Bejuco. Turn right to access the Caracol Beach project, which will take you directly to Punta Chame in another 30 minutes.

  • Bus: From the Albrook Grand Terminal you can board a bus taking any of the following routes: Panama - Chame, Panama - Chitré, Coclé, Los Santos, David. Tell your bus driver that your destination is the entrance to Punta Chame, right off the Pan-American Highway.

What to bring

  • Swimsuit
  • Tent and camping gear
  • Insect repellent
  • Water bottle
  • Swim floats if with children

Activities

    • Camping
    • Surfing
    • Walks on the beach
    • Leisure and recreation


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The first version of the 2014 Gamboa Fishing Tournament was a complete success.


Colors, Abstractions, and Dynamics of a Panamanian Painter. 

With the aim of continuing to strengthen trade ties with Barbados, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Panama, Francisco Álvarez De Soto, held a meeting this past April 30th with the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Trade of Barbados, Maxine McClean, as part of the 6th Summit of the Association of Caribbean States (ACS) and to discuss issues of common interest.

The very first step, before putting on any jewelry or adornments, is the hairdo.

Make a part down the middle of the head and put the hair into two pigtails above the ears. Braid each one, wind them up, and secure into a bun. Now proceed to insert the hair ornaments, first the hair comb in the back of the head, then the side hair combs, and finally the headdress.

Earrings may be made out ​​of gold with precious stones in varying colors and sizes, such as ruby, emerald, or topaz.

The most popular earrings for women wearing a pollera are a tri-hoop made of jet (Zarcillos), a pendant of small coins shaped like a closed eye (Dormilonas), a pearl-drop decorated mostly with cultivated pearls (Mosquetas), and golden hoops made ​​of pearls, coral and traditional goldsmith design (Tangos).

The neck is embraced with a "bone-cover" necklace or choker.

The pollera-wearer delicately and simply covers her clavicle bone by wearing a gold medallion or cross, which is strung through a velvet or black satin ribbon for the Montuna polleras.

The gold choker is adorned with hearts and very delicate butterflies decorated with pearls and filigree gold.

To decorate the pollera blouse and chest, there are several delicate pieces that resemble those worn by the Spaniards during the colonial era.

The cadena chata, which includes the cross of Caravaca, is a delicate chain with golden filigree decorations, the rosary can be made of pearls or other stones, and the showy cabestrillo has an ornament the size of a large golden coin and imprinted with a shield. Interestingly, the witch chain is known for springing open once it is moved.

Additional necklace options include the ducktail scapular, the open cord, the Solomonic chain, the single chain, the chains of charms, and the half orange chain. All are imbued with meaning and have a specific placement that allows for appreciation of each necklace's length, inlays, pearls, and designs, among other features.

Accessories for the Pollera

Additional accessories include buttons on the petticoats, bracelets that usually match the haircombs, and golden buckles and brooches to fasten the multiple chains and cords resting on the pollera costume.

Several different jewelry pieces accompany the pollera and are worn on the head, ears, neck, chest, and to adorn the dress itself.

Ornamental hair combs made of gold with a straight or oval cut and frequently decorated with pearls or sparkly gemstones frame the lady's crown.

Other major golden jewelry pieces for the head are: smaller hair combs, a palm-leaf dagger to one side of the head, and small patches or "golden thoughts" on the temples.

To top it all off, an elaborate hair adornment customarily wraps her head in a flexible floral wreath made of shiny metal, satin, fish scales, pearls, and colored glass or plastic beads. When the woman dances, this tembleque will delicately tremble along and imitate the natural movement of carnations and other countryside flowers.

In addition to such popular floral designs as guate flower, bride's bouquet, and white musk roses, the headdress may imitate animals like the scorpion or dragonfly, or represent other original designs inspired from nature.

Considered the most beautiful costume in the world, the Panamanian pollera is a colorful dress that exudes splendor, distinction, and elegance. Artisans execute every detail involved in the sewing, art, design, and style of each variety, the most well known being: white gala attire (Pollera Santeña); chintz peasant dress (Pollera Montuna); with openwork darning,embroidery, or cross-stitch (Pollera con Labores); household blouse (La Basquiña); and with colorfully striped ribbons (La Pollera Tireada).

The pollera consists of two major pieces, a blouse and a long skirt, both decorated in fine cloth.

The Azuero Peninsula, comprising the provinces of Herrera, Los Santos and part of Veraguas, is where to today artisans conserve the authenticity of the delicate and laborious process of tailoring polleras.

The pollera can be made from the following fabrics:

Linen: Tela de Hilo, El Coco, La Crea de Hilo, El Holán de Motitas

Cotton: El Percal, La Tela Confusa, El Opal, El Anjeo, La Zaraza

Every Panamanian woman dreams of wearing a pollera, which makes her feel proud of the customs and traditions that enrich this isthmus.

It's important to note that the pollera can come in any color, as with the hair adornments and shoes, all depending on its style, type, and category.